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19 inured in NY subway derailment

19 inured in NY subway derailment

SUBWAY:A New York City fire department EMT assists a woman who was evacuated from a subway train after it derailed in the Queens borough of New York, Friday, May 2. The express F train was bound for Manhattan and Brooklyn when it derailed at 10:40 a.m. about 1,200 feet (365 meters) south of the 65th Street station, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Dozens of firefighters and paramedics with stretchers converged on Broadway and 60th Street, where passengers calmly left the tunnel through the sidewalk opening. A few were treated on stretchers. Photo: Associated Press/Julie Jacobson

NEW YORK (Reuters) – A New York City subway train carrying 1,000 riders derailed on Friday morning while traveling through a tunnel in the borough of Queens, injuring 19 people, city fire officials said.

Fifteen people escaped with minor injuries while four more were transported to a hospital with potentially serious injuries, officials said.

The incident, at 10:24 AM local time, involved a Manhattan-bound eight-car “F” line subway, they said. The cause of the derailment was not immediately known.

Video of the scene broadcast on the NY1 channel showed fire officials evacuating throngs of people, in darkness and some through subway grates.

(Reporting By Edith Honan; editing by Gunna Dickson)

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