Clippers sale hangs in balance as trial begins

Clippers sale hangs in balance as trial begins

CLIPPERS CONTROVERSY: Sterling was banned from the NBA for life after he made racist remarks that were recorded. Photo: Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A trial begins in a Los Angeles court today to determine whether a $2 billion sale of the Los Angeles Clippers will go ahead.

Testimony will focus on whether the estranged wife of team owner Donald Sterling had the authority under terms of a family trust to unilaterally negotiate a deal to sell the Clippers to former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer.

Sterling was banned from the NBA for life after he made racist remarks that were recorded.

Sterling’s wife Shelly had two doctors examine her 80-year-old husband and they declared him mentally incapacitated and unable to act as an administrator of The Sterling Family Trust, which owns the Clippers.

The judge must find that Shelly Sterling acted in accordance with the trust and that the deal still applies, even though the trust has since been revoked by Donald Sterling.

Recent Headlines

in National

Fed official still looking at 2015 rate hike


A voting member of the Federal Reserve's policy committee says he believes the economy is on a satisfactory track and an increase in interest rates is likely to be appropriate in either October or December.

in Sports

NFL: Week 5 can’t miss games


Here's five games you'll want to watch in Week 5 of the NFL season.

in Sports

Shaq releases children’s book, wants to be known as ‘Dr. of Fun’


NBA superstar Shaquille O’Neal visits the New York Public Library to discuss his first children’s book “Little Shaq.”

in Sports

Road teams still perfect in MLB postseason


The Kansas City Royals and Toronto Blue Jays finished with the American League's best records during the regular season, but they find themselves trailing in the division series after dropping their openers.

in National

House slams regulators for not catching VW for years


Volkswagen U.S. chief executive blamed "individuals" for cheating on diesel emissions tests as lawmakers attacked environmental regulators for failing to catch the fraud for years.