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Giants pitcher to have season-ending surgery

Giants pitcher to have season-ending surgery

SEASON-ENDING: San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Matt Cain (18) pitches against the Chicago White Sox at U.S Cellular Field on June 17. Photo: Reuters/Matt Marton-USA TODAY Sports

(Reuters) – San Francisco Giants right-hander Matt Cain will undergo season-ending surgery on his elbow, the team announced on Monday.

Cain has not pitched since July 9 due to the injury to his throwing arm. The procedure will remove bone chips from the elbow and he is expected to be ready for Spring Training.

The news is the crushing final blow in what has been a tough campaign for the 29-year-old, who finishes the year with a 2-7 record and a 4.18 ERA.

Cain has played his entire career with the Giants, beginning in 2005. A three-time All Star and two-time World Series champion, Cain tossed the first perfect game for a San Francisco Giants pitcher in 2012.

He is currently in the fifth year of an eight-year, $139.75 million contract that also includes a club option for 2018.

(Writing by Jahmal Corner in Los Angeles; Editing by Peter Rutherford)

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