News

‘Gluten-free’ labeling standards kick in

‘Gluten-free’ labeling standards kick in

GLUTEN FREE: Starting this week, "gluten free" labels on packaged foods have real meaning. Until now, the term "gluten free" had not been regulated, and manufacturers made their own decisions about what it means. Photo: Associated Press/Jon Elswick

MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Starting this week, “gluten-free” labels on packaged foods have real meaning.

Until now, the term “gluten-free” had not been regulated, and manufacturers made their own decisions about what it means.

This new requirement is especially important for people who suffer from celiac disease and don’t absorb nutrients well. They can get sick from the gluten found in wheat and other cereal grains.

Food manufacturers faced a Tuesday deadline to ensure that anything labeled gluten-free contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten — ensuring that those products are technically free of wheat, rye and barley.

That amount is generally recognized by the medical community to be low enough so that most people who have celiac disease won’t get sick if they eat it.

Recent Headlines

2 days ago in Sports

The weekend sports schedule

penscaps16120076416963

Here’s a look at some of the sporting events taking place this weekend.

2 days ago in Sports

The best sports shots this week

goffdraft870850982276

A look at some of the biggest plays and best moments in sports this week.

2 days ago in National

Making headlines this week

kansasweatherAP

A look back at some of the biggest newsmakers this week and the headlines you may have missed.

2 days ago in Sports

Reigning NL batting champ banned 80 games for doping

marlinsdeeREUTERS

Dee Gordon of the Miami Marlins was suspended 80 games without pay after testing positive for a performance-enhancing substance, Major League Baseball said.

3 days ago in National

Teen pregnancies hit historic low

sexed296416402183

The annual survey shows the continuation of a downward trend that began in 2006 and continued through 2014, the latest year of complete data, when nearly 250,000 babies were born to girls and women aged 15 to 19.