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Google considering YouTube, Gmail accounts for kids

Google considering YouTube, Gmail accounts for kids

GOOGLE: Internet companies such as Google and Facebook Inc do not offer their services to children under 13, but it is tough to catch users who sign up by providing false information. Photo: Reuters

(Reuters) – Google Inc is considering allowing online accounts for children under the age of 13 and give their parents control over how the service is used, according to media reports.

Google has been working on a version of YouTube, its video-sharing site, for youngsters and is considering other child-friendly accounts such as its Gmail system, the Financial Times reported, citing a person familiar with the matter.

Internet companies such as Google and Facebook Inc do not offer their services to children under 13, but it is tough to catch users who sign up by providing false information.

The U.S.Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA, imposes strict controls on the collection and use of information about children under 13.

Google’s effort is partly driven by the fact that some parents are already trying to create accounts for their children and the company wants to make the process easier and compliant with the rules, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing a person familiar with the effort.

Google spokesman Peter Barron declined to comment on what he called “rumors and speculation”.

(Reporting by Supantha Mukherjee in Bangalore and Eric Auchard in Vienna; Editing by Savio D’Souza)

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