It’s going to cost you more to mail a letter

It’s going to cost you more to mail a letter

PRICE HIKE: A general view of the new stamp at the launch of the U.S. Postal Service’s limited-edition Cut Paper Heart Forever stamp, this year’s installment to the Love stamp series, on Tuesday, Jan. 21, in New York. The cost to mail a first-class letter increased by 3 cents. Photo: Associated Press/Dario Cantatore/Invision

WASHINGTON (AP) — It’s going to cost you a few pennies more to mail a letter.

The cost of a first-class postage stamp is now 49 cents — 3 cents more than before.

Regulators approved the price hike in December, and it went into effect on Sunday.

Many people won’t feel the increase right away: Forever stamps are good for first-class postage at whatever the future rate.

The last increase for stamps was a year ago, when the cost of sending a letter rose by a penny to 46 cents.

The Postal Service lost $5 billion last year and has been trying to get Congress to let it end Saturday delivery and reduce payments on retiree health benefits.

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