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Nigeria’s president vows to free kidnapped girls

Nigeria’s president vows to free kidnapped girls

KIDNAPPED:Nigeria's President Goodluck Jonathan speaks during a Nigeria-Kenya bilateral business meeting in Abuja, May 5. Photo: Reuters/Folabi Sotunde

By Matthew Mpoke Bigg and Chijioke Ohuocha

ABUJA (Reuters) – Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan pledged on Thursday to find more than 200 schoolgirls abducted by Islamist rebels, as the hostage crisis overshadowed his opening address to a major conference designed to showcase investment opportunities in Africa’s biggest economy.

Speaking at the World Economic Forum (WEF) being hosted in the capital Abuja, Jonathan thanked foreign nations including the United States, Britain, France and China for their support in trying to rescue the girls, who were kidnapped from a secondary school on April 14 by Boko Haram.

He thanked delegates for coming despite the danger posed by the militants, then quickly moved on to a speech about creating jobs in African economies.

“As a nation we are facing attack from terrorism,” Jonathan told delegates. “I believe that the kidnap of these girls will be the beginning of the end of terrorism in Nigeria.”

Despite such pledges, Jonathan admitted on national television this week that he had no idea where the girls were.

The kidnappings and numerous other attacks by Boko Haram have totally overshadowed Nigeria’s hosting of the forum, an annual gathering of the rich and powerful that replicates the one in Davos, Switzerland.

France became the latest nation to offer help on Wednesday, saying it was boosting intelligence ties with Nigeria and sending security service agents there to tackle Boko Haram, the militant group which claimed the mass kidnapping.

With more than 4,000 troops operating between Mali to the west and Central African Republic to the east, Paris has a major interest in preventing Nigeria’s security from deteriorating and has warned that Boko Haram could spread north into the Sahel.

In the latest big Islamist attack in Nigeria, 125 people were killed on Monday when gunmen rampaged through a town in the northeast near the Cameroon border.

A senator from Borno state, Ahmed Zannah, put the number killed at 300, although local politicians have sometimes been accused of exaggerating casualty figures for political reasons.

Either way, the scale and ferocity of the massacre in Gamburu again underscored how far Nigerian security forces are from protecting civilians in an increasingly violent region.

BOKO HARAM

On Tuesday, residents of another village in the remote northeastern area where the schoolgirls were kidnapped said another eight girls were seized by suspected members of Boko Haram.

Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau has threatened in a video to sell the girls abducted on April 14 from a secondary school in Chibok “on the market,” prompting a warning from the United Nations that this would make the perpetrators liable for war crimes.

Boko Haram’s five-year-old insurgency is aimed at reviving a medieval Islamic caliphate in modern Nigeria, whose 170 million people are split roughly evenly between Christians and Muslims, and it is becoming by far the biggest security threat to Africa’s top oil producer.

Last month’s kidnapping occurred on the day a bomb blast, also claimed by Boko Haram, killed 75 people on the outskirts of Abuja, the first attack on the capital in two years. Another bomb nearby killed 19 people last week, prompting a few delegates to cancel their trips to the WEF.

The inability of security forces to protect the girls from being attacked or find them in more than three weeks has sparked national and international outrage and led to protests in Abuja and the commercial capital of Lagos.

Boko Haram has emerged in a region that is one of the world’s poorest, with high infant mortality, low literacy and massive youth unemployment that creates easy recruits for radical Islam. Campaigners often call on the government do more to tackle the north’s underdevelopment, which contrasts with a relatively prosperous, oil-rich and largely Christian south.

Acknowledging this, Africa’s richest man, Aliko Dangote, said he would invest $2.3 billion in sugar and rice production in the north of the country, adding that creating employment was key to ending the insurgency there.

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang gave a speech in which he pledged “no strings” support for an African plan to develop a continent-wide high speed rail network, and said China has set aside $2 billion for an African Development Fund.

He promised China would not interfere in African nations’ internal affairs, a barbed reference to the West, which often attaches human rights and democracy conditions to financial aid.

‘DARK IMPULSES’

U.S. President Barack Obama issued a somber warning on Wednesday that the kidnapping and sectarian conflicts worldwide are a sign that “we have not extinguished man’s darkest impulses.”

Obama accepted a humanitarian award from director Steven Spielberg at the University of Southern California’s Shoah Foundation, a Holocaust museum founded by Spielberg after he made the film “Schindler’s List.”

Obama spoke about a variety of global conflicts including Ukraine, Syria, and the kidnapping by the Boko Haram group.

“We only need to look at today’s headlines: The devastation of Syria, the murders and kidnappings in Nigeria, the sectarian conflicts, the tribal conflicts to see that we have not yet extinguished man’s darkest impulses,” Obama said.

He expressed alarm about a rising tide of anti-Semitism based on events such as a gunman’s attack on two Jewish facilities in Kansas and the distribution of pamphlets in eastern Ukraine that demanded the registration of Jews.

“None of the tragedies that we see today may rise to the full horror of the Holocaust,” he said. However, he said “they demand our attention that we not turn away.”

(Reporting By Steve Holland; Tim Cocks; Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky, Paul Tait and Giles Elgood)

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