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No more ‘having it your way’ at Burger King

No more ‘having it your way’ at Burger King

HOLD THE PICKLES, HOLD THE LETTUCE, SPECIAL ORDERS DON'T UPSET US:Burger King is dropping its 40-year-old jingle and slogan, "Have It Your Way," in an effort to revamp its image. Photo: Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Burger King isn’t just flipping patties, it’s flipping the script — by doing away with its 40-year-old slogan, “Have It Your Way.”

The new slogan: “Be Your Way” — promoting individuality in people, rather than its burgers.

The burger chain says the new tag line will roll out across its marketing in the U.S., including in a TV ad that began airing last night.

Burger King says the new motto is intended to remind people that “they can and should live how they want anytime.”

Whether that will help Burger King close the gap with McDonald’s and carve out a bigger niche in fast food sales remains to be seen.

At least we’ve got YouTube to remind us of the good, old days:

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