‘Octomom’ charged with welfare fraud

‘Octomom’ charged with welfare fraud

OCTOMOM: In this 2010 photo, Nadya Suleman, known as the Octomom, poses for a undated photo in New York to promote her appearance on MTV's 3rd season of "Silent Library" which airs July 6. Photo: Associated Press/Dave Allocca/StarPix

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Los Angeles County prosecutors have charged Octomom Nadya Suleman with welfare fraud.

The district attorney’s office says Monday that Suleman failed to report nearly $30,000 in earnings while applying for public assistance last year.

The district attorney’s office says that Suleman, whose real name is Natalie Denise Suleman, has not been arrested but has been ordered to appear in court on Friday.

A prosecution statement says she was charged on Jan. 6 with one count of aid by misrepresentation and two counts of perjury by false application. If convicted, she faces up to five years and eight months in custody.

In addition to her octuplets, Suleman has six other children.

Efforts to reach Suleman for comment through recent associates were not immediately successful.

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