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PBS show hits baseball treasure trove

PBS show hits baseball treasure trove

BASEBALL HISTORY: This Aug. 9, photo released by Antiques Roadshow shows Leila Dunbar appraising a collection of early Boston baseball memorabilia for the program "Antiques Roadshow" in New York. This is the largest sports memorabilia find in the program's 19-year history, valued at $1 million. Photo: Associated Press/Meredith Nierman

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The PBS series “Antiques Roadshow” says it hit a home run with a collection of 1870s Boston baseball memorabilia.

A trove of signatures and rare baseball cards from Boston Red Stockings players was appraised at $1 million for insurance purposes, series producer Marsha Bemko said.

She said it’s the largest sports memorabilia find in the history of the 19-year-old public TV show, which travels America looking for varied heirlooms and treasures.

The collection was brought to an “Antiques Roadshow” taping Saturday in New York City. The owner inherited it from her great-great-grandmother, who ran a Boston boarding house where the team lived in 1871-72, PBS said.

The baseball franchise is now the Atlanta Braves.

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