News

Pro sports becoming more open to paternity leave

Pro sports becoming more open to paternity leave

PATERNITY LEAVE:New York Mets Daniel Murphy (28) at bat in the ninth inning of the baseball game against the Atlanta Braves Wednesday, April 9, in Atlanta. The Braves won the game 4-3. Photo: Associated Press/Todd Kirkland

JON KRAWCZYNSKI, AP Sports Writer

When New York Mets second baseman Daniel Murphy was criticized on talk radio for spending three days with his family after the birth of his son, teammates, coaches and opponents leapt to his defense.

The four major pro sports leagues in North America are becoming increasingly open to paternity leave as more players express a desire to be with their families when a baby arrives.

Major League Baseball is the only league with a standardized policy written into its rulebook. But the NFL, NBA and NHL have all shown willingness to give their players some time when that day comes.

Players say that kind of compassion is a welcome change from decades ago, when athletes often missed one of life’s biggest moments to stay with their teams.

Recent Headlines

in Entertainment, Sports

Ronda Rousey biopic in the works

rrousey

Paramount executives have picked up the rights to the 28-year-old's autobiography.

in Sports

Daily fantasy sports land in gambling industry crosshairs

yahoofantasy

Each year millions of Americans draft virtual sports teams online and enter real-money competitions that last only a few hours.

in Sports

Bat boy, 9, dies after hit in head by swing at baseball game

17-overlay2

The boy was struck by a follow-through swing near the on-deck circle.

in Sports

SEC spares no expense in hiring 14 new coordinators

muschamp

Coaches around the Southeastern Conference have had to do a little extra homework on opposing coordinators during the offseason.

in National

Obama to unveil tougher climate change plan

globalwarming

President Barack Obama will unveil the final version of his plan to tackle greenhouse gases, kicking off what is expected to be a tumultuous legal battle between federal environmental regulators and coal industry supporters.