News

Senator says he’d sign petition to deport Bieber

Senator says he’d sign petition to deport Bieber

Senator Mark Warner has set the record straight; he's not a Belieber. Photo: Associated Press/Eric Charbonneau/Scott Applewhite

The movement to deport Justin Bieber just got a high-profile supporter. Senator Mark Warner told radio show host Rick Rumble of FM99 in Norfolk, VA that he would sign a petition to remove the singer from the United States. When asked about his stance on the matter, the Virginia democrat said, “As a dad with three daughters, is there someplace I can sign?”

Warner’s office confirmed the sentiment with a post to his Twitter account:

Since Bieber’s arrest last month on drunken driving charges in Miami Beach, Florida, an online petition to have him removed from the country submitted through the White House website has garnered more than 245,000 signatures – surpassing the 100,000 needed to be officially considered by the President of the United States.

Created Jan. 23 by a person in Detroit known as J.A., the petition asks the Obama administration to deport the 19-year-old back to his native Canada because he is “wrongly” representing the U.S. in the pop culture arena.

Recent Headlines

in Black Friday, Entertainment, National

Obama pardons ‘Cheese,’ America’s top turkey

turkeypardon

The President pardoned the official Thanksgiving turkey in a tradition that is truly American.

in Sports

Source: Redskins to start Colt McCoy over RG3

rg3

The Washington Redskins plan to start Colt McCoy over Robert Griffin III on Sunday against the Indianapolis Colts.

in National

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ginsburg has heart procedure

ginsburg

Ruth Bader Ginsburg underwent a heart procedure after reporting discomfort following routine exercise.

in National

Storm threatens to foil Thanksgiving travel for millions

AP672980729096

A nor'easter packing rain and snow is posing special challenges and threatening to cancel flights across the country. a

in National

Judges overturn gay marriage bans in Arkansas, Mississippi

gaymarriage

U.S. judges overturned measures that voters approved a decade ago in both socially conservative Southern states.