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USDA: 17M households are ‘food insecure’

USDA: 17M households are ‘food insecure’

ENOUGH TO EAT: Although the prevalence of sporadic food insecurity has fallen, the number of households with very low food security is persistent, USDA said, even as the U.S. economy has moved on from a severe recession that ended in 2009 and the job market has slowly recovered. Photo: Reuters

By Ros Krasny

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The percentage of Americans regarded as “food insecure” – lacking access to enough food for a healthy life – has declined in the past few years but still represents over 17 million households, the U.S. Agriculture Department said on Wednesday.

About 14.3 percent of households were termed food insecure in 2013, down from 14.9 percent in 2011.

Rates of food insecurity were substantially higher than the national average in households with incomes near or below the poverty line, those headed by single women or single men, and those headed by blacks and Hispanics, USDA’s Economic Research Service said in an annual report.

Food insecurity was also more common in large cities and rural areas than in suburban and exurban areas.

Although the prevalence of sporadic food insecurity has fallen, the number of households with very low food security is persistent, USDA said, even as the U.S. economy has moved on from a severe recession that ended in 2009 and the job market has slowly recovered.

Some 5.6 percent, or 6.8 million households, had very low food security in 2013, meaning that the food intake of some household members was reduced and normal eating patterns were disrupted at times due to limited resources.

USDA said children, though, are usually shielded from the disrupted eating patterns and reduced food intake that characterize very low food security.

Among states, the rates of very low food security in 2013 ranged from 3.1 percent in North Dakota to 8.4 percent in Arkansas.

Almost two-thirds of food-insecure households surveyed by USDA reported that in the previous month they had participated in federal food and nutrition programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly known as food stamps.

About 46.2 million Americans – many of them children or the elderly – are currently enrolled in SNAP, down slightly from a peak of almost 47.8 million, in December 2012.

(Reporting by Ros Krasny; Editing by Jonathan Oatis)

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